Aloe chabaudii

Dwala Aloe is an easy-to-grow, clustering perennial succulent that forms large colonies of turquoise green rosettes. The leaf margins have small teeth and in full sun the tapering leaves take on a pinkish hue.

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Aloe chabaudii

  • Names and Synonyms:  
    Aloe nitens, Aloe pycnacantha
  • Common Names:  
    Dwala Aloe, Chabaud's Aloe
  • Family:  
    Aloeceae
  • Origin:  
    Northeastern South Africa to Zambia and Malawi where it tends to grow on the lower slopes of rocky granite outcroppings.
  • Height:  
    1-2'
  • Width:  
    2-3'
  • Cold Tolerance:  
    25 to 30°F; -3.9 to -1.1°C
  • Heat Tolerance:  
    Very high heat tolerance
  • Light Requirement:  
    Full sun along the coast to shade in hot inland climates
  • Water needs:  
    Drought tolerant but likes irrigation in the hottest summer months, can easily survive on rain in winter
  • Maintenance:  
    Remove spent flower spikes and dead leaves as desired
  • Uses:  
    This is a nice ground covering aloe for partly shady areas of cactus and succulent gardens. It can take full sun along the coast as well. Works fine as a container plant, especially in a wide bowl style of planter which allows the plant to offset and multiply. A. chabaudii could be interesting massed with additional containers of larger leaved aloes which bloom at different times to extend the bloom season.
  • Propagation:  
    Can be propagated by separating offsets but be sure to include some roots on each stem if possible. Can also be grown from seed which is best planted in the fall in trays of course sand.
  • Problems:  
    Requires excellent drainage especially in cooler winter weather. Stress from poor drainage can make the plant more prone to pest problems as well as rots.
  • Special notes:  
    Dwala Aloe is an easy-to-grow, clustering perennial succulent that forms large colonies of turquoise green rosettes. The leaf margins have small teeth and in full sun the tapering leaves take on a pinkish hue. Young plants may have white spots on the leaves which disappear at maturity. Flowering occurs mainly in winter and is a showy, prolific display of orange-red flowers held in branched racemes. Individual flowers are tubular and sought after by nectar loving birds and insects. Out of bloom, this aloe can be mistaken for the similar appearing Aloe globulogemma. This plant originates in a summer rainfall area and appreciates additional water in summer. It easily survives on rainfall alone in winter.