Manfreda ‘Silver Leopard’

  • Manfreda_Silver_Leopard_1gal

one-gallon $15.00

This is a striking accent plant for xeriscape and succulent gardens, working well in borders or as a small-scale groundcover plant. Its leaves are soft so it can be located near pedestrian traffic.

Minimum purchase of any 4 plants for online orders.

All plants shipped bare root in one-gallon sizes.
Other sizes may be available for pick up from

our growing grounds in Fallbrook, 
CA.

For more information, call us at 760-990-4762.
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Manfreda ‘Silver Leopard’

  • Names and Synonyms:  
    Agave strictata, Agave maculosa, Rattlesnake Agave
  • Common Names:  
    Silver Leopard Spice Lily, Spotted Manfreda, Texas Tuberose
  • Family:  
    Agavaceae
  • Origin:  
    This plant is native to the sandy scrublands of southern Texas and northern Mexico.
  • Size Label:  
    one-gallon
  • Height:  
    2'
  • Width:  
    2-3'
  • Cold Tolerance:  
    0 to 5°F, -17.8 to -15°C
  • Heat Tolerance:  
    High heat tolerance.
  • Light Requirement:  
    Full sun along the coast to shade inland.
  • Water needs:  
    High drought tolerant. Leaves are drought deciduous allowing plant to go dormant during hot, dry summers.
  • Maintenance:  
    Remove dead leaves and spent flower spikes as desired.
  • Uses:  
    This is a striking accent plant for xeriscape and succulent gardens, working well in borders or as a small-scale groundcover plant. Its leaves are soft so it can be located near pedestrian traffic. It can also be grown in containers.
  • Propagation:  
    Manfreda can be propagated from root divisions or by collecting and sowing seed.
  • Problems:  
    Rabbits, wood rats, deer and snails love the foliage.
  • Special notes:  
    This wonderful accent plant has broad succulent leaves with a silvery gray hue dotted with large, dark maroon spots. It forms rosettes of spotted silvery blushed blue-green leaves that tend to curl upward at the edges. It grow from a tuber and goes dormant during periods or drought or temperature extremes. It blooms in the spring with long spikes of tuberose like flowers. The flowers are mildly fragrant. Plants tend to decline and die after flowering, but many pups are formed and the plants spread in this fashion to create a colony. The species’ rhizomes were used by the indigenous North American people to make soap and shampoo and Manfreda maculosa (one of the plant’s parents) is host to the now rare manfreda giant skipper butterfly.